How We Played the Revolution

Date: 
February 11, 2016 - 18:00 - 19:30
Building: 
Nador u. 9, Faculty Tower
Room: 
Auditorium
Event type: 
Event audience: 
CEU host unit(s): 
Center for Arts and Culture (CAC)
E-mail: 
Email contact form
How We Played the Revolution

How We Played the Revolution 
(documentary, in Lithuanian with English subtitles, 2011, directed by Giedrė Žickytė, 67 min.)
The story begins in 1984, the very beginning of perestroika in the USSR, when a group of architects in Kaunas, Lithuania decided to put on a one-night gig as a New Year party prank. The joke went so well that rumors about the exciting new rock band Antis began to spread. The impressive make-up and props, the stylized showmanship and lyrics added up to a pervasive caricature of Soviet propaganda and perfectly discredited the absurdity of Soviet reality. Soon the group's intellectual clowning spawned the Rock Marches – massive events involving thousands of people. These turned into the great assemblies for Lithuanian independence that later became known as the Singing Revolution. This is a story about a small country that made headlines right across the world. (OSA)
In cooperation with Vera & Donald Blinken Open Society Archives
The screening is attached to the lecture "Soviet Union" by Alex Astrov in TIGY Room at 15.30 on February 11 in the course "Counter-Cultures and Power During State Socialism."How We Played the Revolution

 

How We Played the Revolution

(documentary, in Lithuanian with English subtitles, 2011, directed by Giedrė Žickytė, 67 min.)

 

The story begins in 1984, the very beginning of perestroika in the USSR, when a group of architects in Kaunas, Lithuania decided to put on a one-night gig as a New Year party prank. The joke went so well that rumors about the exciting new rock band Antis began to spread. The impressive make-up and props, the stylized showmanship and lyrics added up to a pervasive caricature of Soviet propaganda and perfectly discredited the absurdity of Soviet reality. Soon the group's intellectual clowning spawned the Rock Marches – massive events involving thousands of people. These turned into the great assemblies for Lithuanian independence that later became known as the Singing Revolution. This is a story about a small country that made headlines right across the world. (OSA)

 

In cooperation with Vera & Donald Blinken Open Society Archives

 

 

The screening is attached to the lecture "Soviet Union" by Alex Astrov in TIGY Room at 15.30 on February 11 in the course "Counter-Cultures and Power During State Socialism."